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DC to DC converter pinout
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bill
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 29 May 2006
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:15 am    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

I was finally able to locate a suitable replacement converter from
Digikey. The "R" pin is, indeed, a remote on/off. Digikey had a 15W
V-Infinity converter that is the same size as a 10W unit, same pinout,
etc, AND has the remote on/off pin. As a side benefit the output
current is rated at 5VDC @ 3000ma, while the original is rated at
2000ma. I installed it today and it works like a champ!

-Bill


On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 08:18:23 +1000, Franc Zabkar
<fzabkar@iinternode.on.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> put finger
to keyboard and composed:

My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Pullup resistor for Remote on/off?

See
http://www.btcpower.com/PDF/Datasheets/LP/B%20Series/3BB%20DS%20ver2.PDF

- Franc Zabkar
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bill
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 29 May 2006
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:45 pm    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

I didn't see your pdf reference until after I sent you my original
reply. According the spec sheet, if the remote pin is >5.5vdc OR AN
OPEN CIRCUIT, the circuit should be ON. That is how I have been
testing the converter, with nothing connected to pin "R", yet I have
no 5vdc output. That makes me feel better, although I will confirm
tomorrow when I get back to the office where I can test it.

If the converter proves to be defective, and the function of the "R"
pin if for remote on/off, I'm fairly certain the Jameco replacement
will work, aside from not having the ability to turn the device on/off
from the front panel. That is no big deal, since the Tech-2 is a hand
held device that is normally plugged into the vehicles 12vdc power
system when it is in use.

-Bill


On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 08:18:23 +1000, Franc Zabkar
<fzabkar@iinternode.on.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> put finger
to keyboard and composed:

My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Pullup resistor for Remote on/off?

See
http://www.btcpower.com/PDF/Datasheets/LP/B%20Series/3BB%20DS%20ver2.PDF

- Franc Zabkar
Back to top
bill
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 29 May 2006
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:37 pm    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

Shoot, I didn't think of that at all! In my testing I did ground the
"R" pin, since the ground pin was right next to it. Doing that made
no difference, there was still no 5vdc output. I neglected to put a
positive voltage on it. The Tech-2 DOES have a front panel on/off
switch (momentary). Now you've got me thinking the converter is NOT
at fault, it just needs voltage on the "R" pin to enable it. If that
is the case, I just spent 40 bucks at Jameco for a replacement I won't
need.

When I get back to the office tomorrow I will test pin "R" with a
simulated "pullup" voltage to see if that makes any difference with
the output of the converter. If the converter still tests dead and
the function of "R" is, indeed, an "on/off" switch, then I can live
with that. All we will loose is the ability to power down the device
when it is connected to power.

Thanks,

-Bill



On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 08:18:23 +1000, Franc Zabkar
<fzabkar@iinternode.on.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> put finger
to keyboard and composed:

My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Pullup resistor for Remote on/off?

See
http://www.btcpower.com/PDF/Datasheets/LP/B%20Series/3BB%20DS%20ver2.PDF

- Franc Zabkar
Back to top
Franc Zabkar
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 01 May 2005
Posts: 616

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:18 pm    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> put finger
to keyboard and composed:

Quote:
My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Pullup resistor for Remote on/off?

See
http://www.btcpower.com/PDF/Datasheets/LP/B%20Series/3BB%20DS%20ver2.PDF

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.
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Michael A. Terrell
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 2291

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 2:37 pm    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

Michael Kennedy wrote:
Quote:

R may be a voltmeter for the test unit..

"default" <none@nobody.net> wrote in message
news:0gakb2tctsuu6poic59al9pempa3qj5ag3@4ax.com...
On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> wrote:

My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Unfortunately when I examined the circuit board the "R" pin *is*
connected, to a small resistor. So it does SOMETHING, I can't just
leave it unconnected. That means I need to figure out what the "R"
pin is on the old converter, or the new one I install probably won't
work right.

By the way, forget about tracing the "R" circuit. The Tech-2's main
circuit board is jammed with high density, probably proprietary, ICs
on BOTH sides of the board, not to mention it's a high quality,
multilayer circuit board. I can diagnose the bad converter, test some
surface mounted devices such as diodes and capacitors, but that's
about it.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Bill

Put a scope on it and power it up. With processors it is common
enough for the power supply to tell the processor that the voltage is
good - R may be a reset line that is held high when power is within
acceptable limits.


It may also be an input to trim the output voltage. Vicor used this
method on a lot of their power supplies.


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
Member of DAV #85.

Michael A. Terrell
Central Florida
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Michael Kennedy
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 11 Jun 2005
Posts: 401

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 1:42 pm    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

R may be a voltmeter for the test unit..


"default" <none@nobody.net> wrote in message
news:0gakb2tctsuu6poic59al9pempa3qj5ag3@4ax.com...
Quote:
On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> wrote:

My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Unfortunately when I examined the circuit board the "R" pin *is*
connected, to a small resistor. So it does SOMETHING, I can't just
leave it unconnected. That means I need to figure out what the "R"
pin is on the old converter, or the new one I install probably won't
work right.

By the way, forget about tracing the "R" circuit. The Tech-2's main
circuit board is jammed with high density, probably proprietary, ICs
on BOTH sides of the board, not to mention it's a high quality,
multilayer circuit board. I can diagnose the bad converter, test some
surface mounted devices such as diodes and capacitors, but that's
about it.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Bill

Put a scope on it and power it up. With processors it is common
enough for the power supply to tell the processor that the voltage is
good - R may be a reset line that is held high when power is within
acceptable limits.

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News==----
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Newsgroups
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default
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 03 May 2005
Posts: 175

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 12:01 pm    Post subject: Re: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 22:50:05 -0700, bill <bill@harlem.gov> wrote:

Quote:
My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Unfortunately when I examined the circuit board the "R" pin *is*
connected, to a small resistor. So it does SOMETHING, I can't just
leave it unconnected. That means I need to figure out what the "R"
pin is on the old converter, or the new one I install probably won't
work right.

By the way, forget about tracing the "R" circuit. The Tech-2's main
circuit board is jammed with high density, probably proprietary, ICs
on BOTH sides of the board, not to mention it's a high quality,
multilayer circuit board. I can diagnose the bad converter, test some
surface mounted devices such as diodes and capacitors, but that's
about it.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Bill

Put a scope on it and power it up. With processors it is common
enough for the power supply to tell the processor that the voltage is
good - R may be a reset line that is held high when power is within
acceptable limits.

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
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bill
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 29 May 2006
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 5:50 am    Post subject: DC to DC converter pinout Reply with quote

My brother brought me a device known as a Tech-2 scanner, which is
used by GM dealers to troubleshoot and diagnose problems with GM cars
(my brother is the shop manager). He said the tech that was using the
scanner heard a POP, and then the device went dead. To get it
repaired via normal channels would cost over $800, so he wanted me to
take a shot at it first. I took it apart and the trouble appears to
be in a DC to DC converter that is mounted on the main circuit board.
It is made by BTCPower, and the part number is 4BE-01T-02. The IN
voltage is 7-18vdc, and the out is 5vdc at 2000ma. I went to the
BTCPower website and found the specs on the device, but apparently
these things can sometimes be manufactured custom. In the case of
THIS converter, the IN consists of THREE pins, a +, - and one labled
"R". The PDF on the web site does not have this extra "R" pin, so I'm
assuming it's a CUSTOM version the 4BE-01T device referenced on their
web site, specifically designed for use in the Tech-2.

I found and ordered a replacement from JAMECO electronics (#216961),
but it, like most other replacements I looked at, does not have this
"R" pin. I applied power (exactly 12v) to the old converter and
measured the voltage between ground and pin "R", and I read 4.77v. If
I raise the input voltage, the voltage across ground and "R" goes up a
little. If I lower the voltage the voltage across ground and "R" goes
down a little. So I'm thinking it some sort of "reference" voltage
used by the scanner for some reason.

Unfortunately when I examined the circuit board the "R" pin *is*
connected, to a small resistor. So it does SOMETHING, I can't just
leave it unconnected. That means I need to figure out what the "R"
pin is on the old converter, or the new one I install probably won't
work right.

By the way, forget about tracing the "R" circuit. The Tech-2's main
circuit board is jammed with high density, probably proprietary, ICs
on BOTH sides of the board, not to mention it's a high quality,
multilayer circuit board. I can diagnose the bad converter, test some
surface mounted devices such as diodes and capacitors, but that's
about it.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Bill
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