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Capacitor identification 2
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Phil Allison
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 20 May 2005
Posts: 1368

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:31 am    Post subject: Yawn - another Fucker Reply with quote

"Peter Fucker"

Quote:
** See - no indent markers again.

Yes there are.


** You must be hallucinating.

There is none above these very words.



Quote:
My post was the original in the thread,


** But no marker appears when I reply.

That is a VERY RARE event.

It MUST be your software.

ROTFPMSL! So when YOU make a reply with YOUR software, you claim it's my
fault somehow?


** Cos it happens with NO OTHER POSTER .

YOU FUCKING TENTH WIT !!


Hope that stupid X cap blows up in your ugly face.






........ Phil
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Mike Monett
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 516

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:24 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 12:15:11 +0100, Phil Allison <philallison@tpg.com.au> wrote:

Quote:

"Peter Hucker"


** Try connecting it across A and N - see if it explodes.

What?


** See - no indent markers again.

Yes there are. I indented the "see if it explodes line", which can still be seen above, indented one more level than my "what?" However you failed to indent anything at all.

Quote:
BTW

The lack of LHS indent markers with your post is bad usenet practice..

Fix it.

My post was the original in the thread,


** But no marker appears when I reply.

That is a VERY RARE event.

It MUST be your software.

ROTFPMSL! So when YOU make a reply with YOUR software, you claim it's my fault somehow? All your software has to do is take the text of my post, add markers to each line, then let you add text unindented at the end.. Not very hard is it? I bet you're using Outhouse Distress [checks headers] OHO! I was correct. Now how did I know that?

--
http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

He was so unlucky . . .
Last week, his inflatable doll ran off with his airbag.
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Phil Allison
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 20 May 2005
Posts: 1368

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:15 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

"Peter Hucker"

Quote:

** Try connecting it across A and N - see if it explodes.

What?


** See - no indent markers again.




Quote:
BTW

The lack of LHS indent markers with your post is bad usenet practice.

Fix it.

My post was the original in the thread,


** But no marker appears when I reply.

That is a VERY RARE event.

It MUST be your software.



there are not meant to be indent markers you twit.


** Grow up - cretin.




........ Phil.
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Mike Monett
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 516

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:08 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 07:22:25 +0100, jasen <jasen@free.net.nz> wrote:

Quote:
On 2006-07-17, Peter Hucker <no@spam.com> wrote:
http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg


But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less, as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing in series with the original 0.67uF cap.
It did not affect the current at all.


So you hooked it up in series with for example a 500W load and
the load drew full current?

I guess that could explain the fire Smile

Har har. Actually 15mA.

--
http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

Mixed emotions are when your mother-in-law drives your new Ferrari off the cliff.
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Mike Monett
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 516

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:00 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 02:56:30 +0100, Phat Bytestard <phatbytestard@getinmahharddrive.org> wrote:

Quote:
On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 19:56:32 +0100, "Peter Hucker" <no@spam.com> Gave
us:

http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg

Removed from a broken (caught fire!) fanless power supply (fanless PC power supplies are NOT a good idea - Yesico was the manufacturer if you want to avoid them).

It was right next to the AC input, so I assume it's a filter capcitor (to remove high frequency noise?)

It is a specialized cap specifically for AC entry filtration.

It says on it 0.33uF, and my multimeter agrees.

But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less, as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing in series with the original 0.67uF cap. It did not affect the current at all.

Is there something other than a capacitor in here? Ohmeter shows infinite resistance both ways.

The construction of a capacitor will determine the applications for
which it functions best. It may also read fine at low voltages but
leak straight through at some higher (a mere few volts even) voltage,
if it has been breached (read dielectric piercing), that is.

Ah, maybe it's broken then. The fault with the power suply was at the other side of it though, a couple of 2 watt resistors look to have overheated, causing meltdown of quite a few surrounding components.

--
http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

I met this gal in a bar and one thing lead to another. I said, "Let's go back to my place."
She said, "Oh, do you have cable?"
I said, "No, but I have some old ropes that should do just fine."
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Mike Monett
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 516

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 10:56 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 02:09:35 +0100, Phil Allison <philallison@tpg.com.au> wrote:

Quote:

"Peter Hucker"

http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg


** Its an X2 class, 275 volt AC mains cap.

Suitable for connection across active and neutral .



Removed from a broken (caught fire!) fanless power supply (fanless PC power
supplies are NOT a good idea - Yesico was the manufacturer if you want to
avoid them).

It was right next to the AC input, so I assume it's a filter capcitor (to
remove high frequency noise?)

It says on it 0.33uF, and my multimeter agrees.

But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not
limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF
capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less,
as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing
in series with the original 0.67uF cap. It did not affect the current at
all.

Is there something other than a capacitor in here?


** Nope.


Ohmeter shows infinite resistance both ways.


** Try connecting it across A and N - see if it explodes.

What?

Quote:
BTW

The lack of LHS indent markers with your post is bad usenet practice.

Fix it.

My post was the original in the thread, there are not meant to be indent markers you twit. It is YOU who failed to indent what you quoted from me.

--
http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

I have a photographic memory that was never developed.
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jasen
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 204

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 6:22 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On 2006-07-17, Peter Hucker <no@spam.com> wrote:
Quote:
http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg


But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less, as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing in series with the original 0.67uF cap.
It did not affect the current at all.


So you hooked it up in series with for example a 500W load and
the load drew full current?

I guess that could explain the fire :)

Bye.
Jasen
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Phil Allison
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 20 May 2005
Posts: 1368

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:26 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

"Phat Bytestard"

Quote:
Good answer, but will you ever learn how to post properly in Usenet?


** I already am.

Go f*** yourself - s**t head.





........ Phil
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Phat Bytestard
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 15 Jul 2006
Posts: 49

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:03 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 11:09:35 +1000, "Phil Allison"
<philallison@tpg.com.au> Gave us:

Quote:

"Peter Hucker"

http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg


** Its an X2 class, 275 volt AC mains cap.

Suitable for connection across active and neutral .

Good answer, but will you ever learn how to post properly in Usenet?
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Phat Bytestard
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 15 Jul 2006
Posts: 49

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:56 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 19:56:32 +0100, "Peter Hucker" <no@spam.com> Gave
us:

Quote:
http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg

Removed from a broken (caught fire!) fanless power supply (fanless PC power supplies are NOT a good idea - Yesico was the manufacturer if you want to avoid them).

It was right next to the AC input, so I assume it's a filter capcitor (to remove high frequency noise?)

It is a specialized cap specifically for AC entry filtration.
Quote:

It says on it 0.33uF, and my multimeter agrees.

But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less, as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing in series with the original 0.67uF cap. It did not affect the current at all.

Is there something other than a capacitor in here? Ohmeter shows infinite resistance both ways.

The construction of a capacitor will determine the applications for
which it functions best. It may also read fine at low voltages but
leak straight through at some higher (a mere few volts even) voltage,
if it has been breached (read dielectric piercing), that is.
Back to top
Phil Allison
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 20 May 2005
Posts: 1368

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:09 am    Post subject: Re: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

"Peter Hucker"

http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg


** Its an X2 class, 275 volt AC mains cap.

Suitable for connection across active and neutral .



Removed from a broken (caught fire!) fanless power supply (fanless PC power
supplies are NOT a good idea - Yesico was the manufacturer if you want to
avoid them).

It was right next to the AC input, so I assume it's a filter capcitor (to
remove high frequency noise?)

It says on it 0.33uF, and my multimeter agrees.

But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not
limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF
capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less,
as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing
in series with the original 0.67uF cap. It did not affect the current at
all.

Is there something other than a capacitor in here?


** Nope.


Ohmeter shows infinite resistance both ways.


** Try connecting it across A and N - see if it explodes.



BTW

The lack of LHS indent markers with your post is bad usenet practice.

Fix it.




......... Phil
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Mike Monett
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 516

PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:56 pm    Post subject: Capacitor identification 2 Reply with quote

http://www.hucker.plus.com/temp/cap2.jpg

Removed from a broken (caught fire!) fanless power supply (fanless PC power supplies are NOT a good idea - Yesico was the manufacturer if you want to avoid them).

It was right next to the AC input, so I assume it's a filter capcitor (to remove high frequency noise?)

It says on it 0.33uF, and my multimeter agrees.

But, when I tried to use it in a circuit to limit AC current, it did not limit. I expected it to limit the current twice as much as a 0.67uF capacitor which I had in the cirucit previously. It limited it a lot less, as it blew stuff! Replaced blown components in circuit, then put this thing in series with the original 0.67uF cap. It did not affect the current at all.

Is there something other than a capacitor in here? Ohmeter shows infinite resistance both ways.

--
http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

An archaeologist is the best husband a woman can have. The older she gets the more interested in her he is.
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