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Circuit Power Consumption
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phaeton
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:44 pm    Post subject: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

Hello!

A few questions if I may. I realize this is probably basic Ohm's Law
stuff, but I want to double check with some of you, if possible.

If it matters, the circuit in question would be this:

- One garden-variety 555 timer circuit that holds its output LOW for
around 6 to 10 hours, then puts it HIGH for about 4 or 5 seconds.

- One garden-variety 555 oscillator circuit that (using a small
switching transistor) gets 'powered on' by the HIGH state of the above
circuit. When this circuit is powered on it pumps a square wave into a
piezo buzzer. When the above circuit's output goes back to LOW, the
transistor is biased off and power is interrupted to this circuit. I
would use 2 separate timers instead of a dual timer just for the reason
of leaving the second 555 powered completely off for the 6-10 hour
duration.

So it's a circuit that will sleep for several hours, rudely but briefly
'buzz', then fall silent again for several hours. I plan on powering
this all with a single 9V battery, with a voltage divider to cut it
down to 5V. For longevity of battery life, should I:

1) Use 755 timer(s) for one or both halves? Will the 755 be able to
drive a piezo buzzer?

2) Use very high value resistances in the voltage divider, i.e.
V+-->40MegaOhms-->Vref-->50MegaOhms-->Gnd ?

3) Use a different timer or approach altogether? On data sheets, is it
the "Power dissipation" field that indicates how current-hungry devices
are (I realize it's depending on a lot of other factors, though).

4) This circuit will be exposed to outdoor temperature changes. Will
that make a very large impact on its timing intervals?

5) Any estimate as what to expect for battery life? I realize that a
precise answer is hard, but am I looking at hours, days, weeks or
months, perhaps?

Any suggestions appreciated. Thankyou.

-phaeton
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John Fields
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3260

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 26 Jun 2006 10:44:37 -0700, "phaeton" <blahbleh666@hotmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
Hello!

A few questions if I may. I realize this is probably basic Ohm's Law
stuff, but I want to double check with some of you, if possible.

If it matters, the circuit in question would be this:

- One garden-variety 555 timer circuit that holds its output LOW for
around 6 to 10 hours, then puts it HIGH for about 4 or 5 seconds.

- One garden-variety 555 oscillator circuit that (using a small
switching transistor) gets 'powered on' by the HIGH state of the above
circuit. When this circuit is powered on it pumps a square wave into a
piezo buzzer. When the above circuit's output goes back to LOW, the
transistor is biased off and power is interrupted to this circuit. I
would use 2 separate timers instead of a dual timer just for the reason
of leaving the second 555 powered completely off for the 6-10 hour
duration.

So it's a circuit that will sleep for several hours, rudely but briefly
'buzz', then fall silent again for several hours. I plan on powering
this all with a single 9V battery, with a voltage divider to cut it
down to 5V. For longevity of battery life, should I:

1) Use 755 timer(s) for one or both halves? Will the 755 be able to
drive a piezo buzzer?

---
No. A 555 is a very bad choice for such a long timeout. However,
the second one could be used to drive a piezo buzzer.
---

Quote:
2) Use very high value resistances in the voltage divider, i.e.
V+-->40MegaOhms-->Vref-->50MegaOhms-->Gnd ?

---
No. There is no need for a voltage divider since CMOS is available
which can run directly off of 9V at _very_ low current.
---

Quote:
3) Use a different timer or approach altogether? On data sheets, is it
the "Power dissipation" field that indicates how current-hungry devices
are (I realize it's depending on a lot of other factors, though).

---
I'd use something like a 4060 for the timer and a transistor to turn
on a 555 astable to drive the piezo buzzer.
---

Quote:
4) This circuit will be exposed to outdoor temperature changes. Will
that make a very large impact on its timing intervals?

---
depends on what's being used to generate the timer's clock. What
kind of stability do you need?
---


Quote:
5) Any estimate as what to expect for battery life? I realize that a
precise answer is hard, but am I looking at hours, days, weeks or
months, perhaps?

---
Neglecting the buzzer for a moment, if the rest of the circuit draws
500 microamps from the battery, all the time, and the battery has a
capacity of 500mAH, that means you can expect about 1000 hours out
of the battery. About 6 weeks.

If the buzzer needs 50mA and it runs for 15 seconds a day, that's
only increasing the load on the battery by about 9 microamps, so the
life would still be about 6 weeks. The trick here would be to get
the timer to run on as little current as possible. I think 100
microamps is doable and that would get the life up to about 10000
hours. About 417 days.


--
John Fields
Professional Circuit Designer
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John Fields
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3260

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 13:33:42 -0500, John Fields
<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote:


Quote:
---
Neglecting the buzzer for a moment, if the rest of the circuit draws
500 microamps from the battery, all the time, and the battery has a
capacity of 500mAH, that means you can expect about 1000 hours out
of the battery. About 6 weeks.

If the buzzer needs 50mA and it runs for 15 seconds a day, that's
only increasing the load on the battery by about 9 microamps, so the
life would still be about 6 weeks. The trick here would be to get
the timer to run on as little current as possible. I think 100
microamps is doable and that would get the life up to about 10000
hours. About 417 days.

---
Oops...
Checking Eveready's site gives 625mAH for their 9V alkaline, so with
a 100A load that's 6250 hours, or about 260 days.



--
John Fields
Professional Circuit Designer
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Jasper Keuning
electronics forum beginner


Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 10:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

Quote:
a 100A load that's 6250 hours, or about 260 days.
If 260 isn't enough, you can go even further by taking a small cheap MCU

like a picmicro, use it's internal Watchdog timer to handle the timing, and
then drive the peizo from the pic using a FET like the bss123.

The only tricky part is getting a low power Regulator to power the pic. I
used the tps715xx from TI, although it's quite a challange to put them on
your PCB by hand Smile. Maybe you can use a zener for this, but my personal
experience with them is quite limited and the experience I do have usually
involves needing alot more current then the 4uA from the LDO.

All this should not draw more then 4 to 5 uA when idle. So it could work for
many years on a single 9V block. Assuming of course your piezo doesn't take
up too much energy.

Goodluck to you.

Jasper
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phaeton
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 4:16 am    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

Quote:

---
No. A 555 is a very bad choice for such a long timeout. However,
the second one could be used to drive a piezo buzzer.
---

(and)

Quote:
---
No. There is no need for a voltage divider since CMOS is available
which can run directly off of 9V at _very_ low current.

Ahh ok. is the "755" and "CMOS 555 Timer" the same thing? Jameco's
'search' function was giving me the same results for both searches, but
IMHO it's not the greatest at times.

Quote:
I'd use something like a 4060 for the timer and a transistor to turn
on a 555 astable to drive the piezo buzzer.

Good thing I asked. I had never heard of a CD4060 before Wink Does "CD"
mean 'CMOS' or something?

Quote:
---

4) This circuit will be exposed to outdoor temperature changes. Will
that make a very large impact on its timing intervals?

---
depends on what's being used to generate the timer's clock. What
kind of stability do you need?
---

It's pretty non-critical. The long 'wait' period could vary by a
couple of hours, actually. I would prefer it to err on the side of
longer, but either direction is ok. I bet that any variation would be
in *minutes* at the most, huh?

However, when you say "what's being used to generate the timer's
clock", do you mean 'which IC'? I'm assuming that the 4060 can be set
up to just 'run' automatically once you apply power to it, like the 555
and things, right? No need for an external clock or trigger.

Quote:


5) Any estimate as what to expect for battery life? I realize that a
precise answer is hard, but am I looking at hours, days, weeks or
months, perhaps?

---
Neglecting the buzzer for a moment, if the rest of the circuit draws
500 microamps from the battery, all the time, and the battery has a
capacity of 500mAH, that means you can expect about 1000 hours out
of the battery. About 6 weeks.

If the buzzer needs 50mA and it runs for 15 seconds a day, that's
only increasing the load on the battery by about 9 microamps, so the
life would still be about 6 weeks. The trick here would be to get
the timer to run on as little current as possible. I think 100
microamps is doable and that would get the life up to about 10000
hours. About 417 days.


Thanks for this rundown on the time, or *specifically* how you deduced
it. It's given me more stuff to google Wink 260 days is entirely
acceptable. The plan is to build several of these circuits with
slightly varying 'wait' periods, and tape each one to a 9V battery.
Then I'll randomly stash them out in my best friend's workshop and see
how long it takes to annoy the bejeebus out of him >Smile I'll pretend
like I don't hear them or something. After awhile I'll stick one under
the seat of his truck and one under the lid of his toilet or something.

(We prank each other all the time, it's all great fun.)

Thanks for all the suggestions and help.

Jasper:
If i were to use a uC then I'd have to make it play music or something.
You know, "The Atmel Tiny Canon in Dbminor" or something Smile
I'm already trying hard enough to resist using multiple buzzers and
multiple 555s to play reciprocating tritones or something. :-D

Quote:
--
John Fields
Professional Circuit Designer

-Phaeton,
Stark Raving Mad Scientist
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jasen
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 204

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:46 am    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 2006-06-26, phaeton <blahbleh666@hotmail.com> wrote:
Quote:
Hello!

A few questions if I may. I realize this is probably basic Ohm's Law
stuff, but I want to double check with some of you, if possible.

If it matters, the circuit in question would be this:

- One garden-variety 555 timer circuit that holds its output LOW for
around 6 to 10 hours, then puts it HIGH for about 4 or 5 seconds.

- One garden-variety 555 oscillator circuit that (using a small
switching transistor) gets 'powered on' by the HIGH state of the above
circuit. When this circuit is powered on it pumps a square wave into a
piezo buzzer. When the above circuit's output goes back to LOW, the
transistor is biased off and power is interrupted to this circuit. I
would use 2 separate timers instead of a dual timer just for the reason
of leaving the second 555 powered completely off for the 6-10 hour
duration.

So it's a circuit that will sleep for several hours, rudely but briefly
'buzz', then fall silent again for several hours.

I plan on powering
this all with a single 9V battery, with a voltage divider to cut it
down to 5V. For longevity of battery life, should I:

scrap the above, voltage dividers waste most of the energy they get, 9V
batteries are over priced,

if 5V is enough for your needs use 4 AA cells, 1t's 6v but the 555 won't care.

a 555, 7555 etc will operate off upto 16V no problems

Quote:
1) Use 755 timer(s) for one or both halves? Will the 755 be able to
drive a piezo buzzer?

DYM a piezo speaker element or a piezo sounder?

Quote:
2) Use very high value resistances in the voltage divider, i.e.
V+-->40MegaOhms-->Vref-->50MegaOhms-->Gnd ?

do that an there'll be no power to run the 555

Quote:
3) Use a different timer or approach altogether?

yes, use a 4096 for the delay, have it drive a transistor which switches
a buzzer. By buzzer I mean a device that accepts 6vDC and produces a
continuous tone.

Quote:
4) This circuit will be exposed to outdoor temperature changes. Will
that make a very large impact on its timing intervals?

depends on the parts you use.

Quote:
5) Any estimate as what to expect for battery life? I realize that a
precise answer is hard, but am I looking at hours, days, weeks or
months, perhaps?

the circuit you described will not work and with lower resistors in the
divider will waste more than half the energy in the battery.

Bye.
Jasen
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jasen
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 204

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:50 am    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 2006-06-26, Jasper Keuning <j.d.keuning@NOSPAMstudent.utwente.nl> wrote:
Quote:
a 100A load that's 6250 hours, or about 260 days.
If 260 isn't enough, you can go even further by taking a small cheap MCU
like a picmicro, use it's internal Watchdog timer to handle the timing, and
then drive the peizo from the pic using a FET like the bss123.

The only tricky part is getting a low power Regulator to power the pic. I
used the tps715xx from TI, although it's quite a challange to put them on
your PCB by hand Smile. Maybe you can use a zener for this, but my personal
experience with them is quite limited and the experience I do have usually
involves needing alot more current then the 4uA from the LDO.

All this should not draw more then 4 to 5 uA when idle. So it could work for
many years on a single 9V block. Assuming of course your piezo doesn't take
up too much energy.


use a chip that'll run directly off the battery. (maybe use a 3v, or 4.5v
supply)


--

Bye.
Jasen
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jasen
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 204

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:00 am    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 2006-06-27, phaeton <blahbleh666@hotmail.com> wrote:
Quote:


---
No. A 555 is a very bad choice for such a long timeout. However,
the second one could be used to drive a piezo buzzer.
---
(and)

---
No. There is no need for a voltage divider since CMOS is available
which can run directly off of 9V at _very_ low current.

Ahh ok. is the "755" and "CMOS 555 Timer" the same thing? Jameco's
'search' function was giving me the same results for both searches, but
IMHO it's not the greatest at times.

AFAIK 7555 and 4555 are variuation on the CMOS based 555 theme
Quote:

I'd use something like a 4060 for the timer and a transistor to turn
on a 555 astable to drive the piezo buzzer.

Good thing I asked. I had never heard of a CD4060 before Wink Does "CD"
mean 'CMOS' or something?

4060 is a cmos part number CD4060 is one variation on that part
(R-C oscilator with 14-stage divider (divide the frequency by 4096))

Quote:
It's pretty non-critical. The long 'wait' period could vary by a
couple of hours, actually. I would prefer it to err on the side of
longer, but either direction is ok. I bet that any variation would be
in *minutes* at the most, huh?

you'll need to look at the stability of the capacitors you choose,

Quote:
However, when you say "what's being used to generate the timer's
clock", do you mean 'which IC'?

more the timing parts, resistor and capacitor.

I'm assuming that the 4060 can be set
Quote:
up to just 'run' automatically once you apply power to it, like the 555
and things, right? No need for an external clock or trigger.

yup.

Quote:
Jasper:
If i were to use a uC then I'd have to make it play music or something.
You know, "The Atmel Tiny Canon in Dbminor" or something Smile
I'm already trying hard enough to resist using multiple buzzers and
multiple 555s to play reciprocating tritones or something. Very Happy

Smile polyphonic music is totally doable and the power consumption is less than
10 microamps.

Bye.
Jasen
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John Fields
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3260

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 2:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 26 Jun 2006 21:16:35 -0700, "phaeton" <blahbleh666@hotmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:


---
No. A 555 is a very bad choice for such a long timeout. However,
the second one could be used to drive a piezo buzzer.
---
(and)

---
No. There is no need for a voltage divider since CMOS is available
which can run directly off of 9V at _very_ low current.

Ahh ok. is the "755" and "CMOS 555 Timer" the same thing? Jameco's
'search' function was giving me the same results for both searches, but
IMHO it's not the greatest at times.

---
There are many CMOS variations of the 555, the 7555 being Maxim's
version. I'm not familiar with a "755" version of the 555.
---

Quote:
I'd use something like a 4060 for the timer and a transistor to turn
on a 555 astable to drive the piezo buzzer.

Good thing I asked. I had never heard of a CD4060 before Wink Does "CD"
mean 'CMOS' or something?

---
It may, but I don't think so. CA and CD were RCA'a prefixes for
their analog and digital integrated circuits, but their analog
circuits were bipolar, so the "C" part of "CA" wouldn't mean CMOS.
Maybe "Chip"... Kind of like National's LM = Linear Monolithic and
DM = Digital Monolithic.
---


Quote:
4) This circuit will be exposed to outdoor temperature changes. Will
that make a very large impact on its timing intervals?

---
depends on what's being used to generate the timer's clock. What
kind of stability do you need?
---

It's pretty non-critical. The long 'wait' period could vary by a
couple of hours, actually. I would prefer it to err on the side of
longer, but either direction is ok. I bet that any variation would be
in *minutes* at the most, huh?

---
If you used a decent capacitor with a tempco of 200ppm/C, a resistor
with a tempco of 100ppm and assume 500ppm/C for the chip (I can't
find any tempco data) that's 800ppm/C worst case, so for a change
from 0 to 38C (32 to 100F) you'd have a change of about 2.6%, which
is about 12-1/2 minutes.
---

Quote:
However, when you say "what's being used to generate the timer's
clock", do you mean 'which IC'?

---
No, I mean which components.
---

Quote:
I'm assuming that the 4060 can be set
up to just 'run' automatically once you apply power to it, like the 555
and things, right? No need for an external clock or trigger.

---
Right. All it takes is one capacitor and two resistors.
---

Quote:
Thanks for all the suggestions and help.

---
You're welcome. Would you like a schematic?


--
John Fields
Professional Circuit Designer
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phaeton
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 4:06 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

Quote:
Thanks for all the suggestions and help.

---
You're welcome. Would you like a schematic?


I'd love one, if you have one handy. I've been reading over the
datasheet for the 4060 and it's starting to make sense. Maybe a quick
outline of one in practical use would help as well.

Otherwise, I'll figure it out eventually.. :-)

-phaeton
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John Fields
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3260

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 28 Jun 2006 09:06:13 -0700, "phaeton" <blahbleh666@hotmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:

Thanks for all the suggestions and help.

---
You're welcome. Would you like a schematic?


I'd love one, if you have one handy. I've been reading over the
datasheet for the 4060 and it's starting to make sense. Maybe a quick
outline of one in practical use would help as well.

Otherwise, I'll figure it out eventually.. Smile

---
I posted a schematic for you on alt.binaries.schematics.electronic,
but since you're hooked up to USENET through that goddam Google
Groups, you won't be able to get to it. Email me a valid email
address and I'll send it to you there.


--
John Fields
Professional Circuit Designer
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phaeton
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 8:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

Quote:
---
I posted a schematic for you on alt.binaries.schematics.electronic,
but since you're hooked up to USENET through that goddam Google
Groups, you won't be able to get to it. Email me a valid email
address and I'll send it to you there.



Hear Hear! Gaaddaamn Google is only a function of surfing Groups at
work. At home I'll fire up Pan and grab it there. I'll toss you my
email addy though, just for social development purposes.

You're the best!

-phaeton
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John Fields
electronics forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3260

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 9:06 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

On 28 Jun 2006 13:53:05 -0700, "phaeton" <blahbleh666@hotmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:

---
I posted a schematic for you on alt.binaries.schematics.electronic,
but since you're hooked up to USENET through that goddam Google
Groups, you won't be able to get to it. Email me a valid email
address and I'll send it to you there.



Hear Hear! Gaaddaamn Google is only a function of surfing Groups at
work. At home I'll fire up Pan and grab it there. I'll toss you my
email addy though, just for social development purposes.

You're the best!

---
Thanks!

Here's the simulation, using LTSPICE:


Version 4
SHEET 1 1092 680
WIRE -464 224 -464 -176
WIRE -464 368 -464 304
WIRE -464 416 -464 368
WIRE -304 -64 -304 -128
WIRE -304 32 -304 0
WIRE -304 96 -304 64
WIRE -304 224 -304 160
WIRE -304 368 -464 368
WIRE -304 368 -304 304
WIRE -272 -64 -304 -64
WIRE -272 0 -304 0
WIRE -272 96 -304 96
WIRE -272 160 -304 160
WIRE -160 -16 -208 -16
WIRE -160 -16 -160 -64
WIRE -160 16 -304 64
WIRE -160 16 -160 -16
WIRE -160 64 -304 32
WIRE -160 144 -208 144
WIRE -160 144 -160 64
WIRE 96 -128 -304 -128
WIRE 96 0 96 -128
WIRE 96 32 96 0
WIRE 96 96 96 64
WIRE 96 256 96 160
WIRE 96 272 96 256
WIRE 96 368 -304 368
WIRE 96 368 96 336
WIRE 128 -64 -160 -64
WIRE 128 0 96 0
WIRE 128 96 96 96
WIRE 128 160 96 160
WIRE 128 256 96 256
WIRE 240 -16 192 -16
WIRE 240 16 96 64
WIRE 240 16 240 -16
WIRE 240 64 96 32
WIRE 240 144 192 144
WIRE 240 144 240 64
WIRE 240 256 208 256
WIRE 240 256 240 144
WIRE 304 -16 240 -16
WIRE 304 208 304 -16
WIRE 368 64 368 -16
WIRE 368 144 368 64
WIRE 416 64 368 64
WIRE 448 144 368 144
WIRE 448 208 304 208
WIRE 560 -16 368 -16
WIRE 576 64 496 64
WIRE 576 192 512 192
WIRE 576 192 576 64
WIRE 640 192 576 192
WIRE 768 -16 624 -16
WIRE 768 192 704 192
WIRE 768 192 768 -16
WIRE 800 -16 768 -16
WIRE 912 -16 880 -16
WIRE 976 -176 -464 -176
WIRE 976 -64 976 -176
WIRE 976 96 976 32
WIRE 976 368 96 368
WIRE 976 368 976 176
FLAG -464 416 0
SYMBOL res 224 240 R90
WINDOW 0 -32 58 VBottom 0
WINDOW 3 -32 63 VTop 0
SYMATTR InstName R1
SYMATTR Value 10E6
SYMBOL cap 80 272 R0
WINDOW 0 -38 31 Left 0
WINDOW 3 -56 56 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName C1
SYMATTR Value 4.7e-7
SYMBOL Digital\\or 160 -96 R0
WINDOW 0 -30 14 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName A1
SYMATTR SpiceLine trise 1e-6 tfall 1e-6 vhigh 9v
SYMBOL voltage -304 208 R0
WINDOW 3 24 104 Invisible 0
WINDOW 123 0 0 Left 0
WINDOW 39 0 0 Left 0
SYMATTR Value PULSE(0 5 0 1e-7 1e-7 1e-6 0 1)
SYMATTR InstName V1
SYMBOL res 512 48 R90
WINDOW 0 -29 58 VBottom 0
WINDOW 3 -28 61 VTop 0
SYMATTR InstName R2
SYMATTR Value 10K
SYMBOL cap 624 -32 R90
WINDOW 0 -30 32 VBottom 0
WINDOW 3 -31 31 VTop 0
SYMATTR InstName C2
SYMATTR Value 1E-6
SYMBOL pnp 912 32 M180
SYMATTR InstName Q1
SYMATTR Value 2N4403
SYMBOL res 896 -32 R90
WINDOW 0 0 56 VBottom 0
WINDOW 3 32 56 VTop 0
SYMATTR InstName R3
SYMATTR Value 1000
SYMBOL voltage -464 208 R0
WINDOW 3 24 104 Invisible 0
WINDOW 123 0 0 Left 0
WINDOW 39 0 0 Left 0
SYMATTR Value 9
SYMATTR InstName V2
SYMBOL res 960 80 R0
SYMATTR InstName R4
SYMATTR Value 90
SYMBOL Digital\\or 160 64 R0
WINDOW 0 -30 14 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName A2
SYMATTR SpiceLine trise 1e-6 tfall 1e-6 vhigh 9v
SYMBOL Digital\\or 480 112 R0
WINDOW 0 -30 14 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName A3
SYMATTR SpiceLine trise 1e-6 tfall 1e-6 vhigh 9v
SYMBOL Digital\\or 672 112 R0
WINDOW 0 -30 14 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName A4
SYMATTR SpiceLine trise 1e-6 tfall 1e-6 vhigh 9v
SYMBOL Digital\\or -240 -96 R0
WINDOW 0 -30 14 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName A5
SYMATTR SpiceLine trise 1e-6 tfall 1e-6 vhigh 9v
SYMBOL Digital\\or -240 64 R0
WINDOW 0 -30 14 Left 0
SYMATTR InstName A6
SYMATTR SpiceLine trise 1e-6 tfall 1e-6 vhigh 9v
TEXT -458 386 Left 0 !.tran 30 uic
TEXT -152 -40 Left 0 ;Q13
TEXT -296 -104 Left 0 ;RESET
TEXT -280 192 Left 0 ;4060



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John Fields
Professional Circuit Designer
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phaeton
electronics forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Sat Jul 01, 2006 3:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Circuit Power Consumption Reply with quote

John Fields wrote:
Quote:
On 28 Jun 2006 13:53:05 -0700, "phaeton" <blahbleh666@hotmail.com
wrote:


You know, I replied to this last night with my newsreader, and it
hasn't shown up yet (nor have any of the others I've posted to other
groups).


Oh well....I'll wait a day or two and repost if necessary.

-phaeton
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